Category Archives: Lecture

February Lecture 2017 – SIR ARTHUR MARSHALL LECTURE

“The Flying Exploits of Sir Arthur Marshall

Thursday 2nd February 2017

Lecture Starts at 6.00 pm
Post-Lecture Reception at 7.30 pm

Speaker: Terry Holloway, Managing Director, Cambridge Aeroclub and Marshall Group Historian

Location: Churchill College, Wolfson Hall, Storey’s Way, Cambridge CB3 0DS.
NOTE: Parking is available all along Churchill Road and in the main car park at the end of that road. Please register in advance if you require Disabled Parking by Contacting membership@cambridgeraes.info

January Lecture 2017

Martin-Baker Ejector Seat Developments

Thursday 12th January 2017

Lecture Starts at 7.30 pm
Light Refreshments served from 7.00 pm

Speaker: James Pearse, IPT Lead Martin-Baker Aircraft Company Limited

Location: Lecture Theatre ‘0’, Cambridge University Engineering Department, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ.

Lecture Synopsis

The lecture will begin with a brief introduction to the Martin-Baker Aircraft Company Limited and a highlight review of earlier ejection seat developments. The lecture will then focus on the dominant challenges facing modern crew escape systems, the associated requirements, and the means by which those requirements are met by recent Martin-Baker ejection seats.

December Lecture 2016

From Flying Dreadnought to Dogfighter

Thursday 8th December 2016

Lecture Starts at 7.30 pm
Mulled wine and Mince pies to follow after lecture.

Speaker: Greg Baughen, Aviation Author

Location: Lecture Theatre ‘0’, Cambridge University Engineering Department, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ.

Lecture Synopsis

Long before the first shots were fired in the Great War, army generals knew that aircraft were going to play a crucial role in future wars. They also realised that some way of shooting down enemy planes had to be found.   Designers and engineers were soon struggling to find a way of doing this. In this talk, Greg Baughen describes the story behind British efforts to overcome the problems. Inspired by the Royal Navy’s dreadnoughts, the Royal Flying Corps planned to rule the skies with their own aerial battleships.  It was an approach that proved to be a mistake and would delay the development of the single-seater fighters that were needed to challenge the German Fokkers and Albatroses. The Pup, Camel and S.E.5a eventually emerged and helped save the day, but the battleship fighter was never abandoned completely. Even at the end of the war, there were still plans to develop them and the concept would continue to influence British fighter design long after the First World War.